24 comments

    • YusefWateef

      I’m with you Natisha, when you say “has been convinced to look outside of themselves for the answer.” I can’t think of any group that has been granted freedom or equality without the people in that community being willing to band together, cause social disruptions and/or shed blood (theirs and possibly that of the oppressors) for what they want.

      ~Watt

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    • YusefWateef

      I just can’t get past seeing so many people who genuinely believe that freedom of any sort will be granted by the people who knowingly took it. Guilt has never been a factor in ending any oppression.

      Can you give me a few examples of any freedom being granted without the oppressors being made to suffer greatly by the people they hurt, and then only begrudgingly begin to acquiesce?

      Thank you for sharing your thoughts,
      ~Watt

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  1. Pingback: Oppression – Manosphere.com
  2. T. Michelle

    Because most oppressed people have been made to believe that they are inferior and their oppressor is superior. Consequently, the oppressed unconsciously come to believe they are incapable of success without the approval or acquiescence of their oppressor. This is a global phenomenon best demonstrated by white supremacy, which has subjugated people of color around the planet and made them think that white or lighter skin trumps all.

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    • Anonymous

      As a white person, it saddens me to see the world so divided right now, in such an age of communication and education. There’s just no justification for the persistent continuation of this line of thought. I don’t think it has so much to do with white people hating everyone else though. I think it’s a product of white people with huge power who are willing to do anything to keep it. Why else would black people rapping about killing other black people be the only socially accepted form of violent entertainment. It also helps their case when the only news coverage black people get is when the police kill them, or when they have gotten in trouble themselves. It’s not “white people” who are the problem. It’s white establishment. It’s a black president who did precious little to quell racial tensions while he was in office for eight years, or a black Supreme Court Justice who won’t speak for 10 years. Enough is not being made of the chances that are won. It’s not only black people, though. Ask Mexicans and Chinese people how great they feel living in a country full of people who hate them. It’s the establishment. When the underdogs grab a bit of power it needs to be taken advantage of fully.

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      • T. Michelle

        This argument that President Obama “did precious little to quell racial tensions” during his time in office is disingenuous. Why should he be held to a different standard than Bush 1 & 2, Clinton, Reagan, or any other US president, none of whom made ANY effort to address racial issues? Frankly, I’d argue that Obama was the only one to make an attempt and when he did so, it was met with derision, disdain and misunderstanding by most whites. America was founded on racism and white supremacy and it has thrived on those principles for 400+ years (one need only look at the rise of Donald Trump for further affirmation). That’s why there is so much division. When “white people” choose to continue to benefit from their privilege and do nothing to dismantle the unequal power structure, they are “the establishment” and are just as guilty.

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      • YusefWateef

        Choosing not to do anything about racism is a choice. I am still undecided as to whether not benefiting from privilege and inequality is chosen, or a default setting that someone has to be made aware of in order to know it exists.

        Liked by 1 person

      • Anonymous

        I sure did benefit a lot when I was turned down from universities and jobs in the 90’s due to affirmative action. I sure did benefit in the Air Force when I was deployed to the Middle East and was not allowed into certain areas due to the color of my skin and my nationality. But yeah, sick to your belief that white people can only be privileged. Education, on both sides, is the only thing that can ever stop a sickness like this.

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    • YusefWateef

      Let’s not limit it to a Black/White issue even though that is most relevant to me. I have under-represented friends, spread out among many different groups suffering the same fate.

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  3. Erica

    Many oppressed people are compassionate they have seen or been through rough times, they think everyone, including their often heartless oppressors also possess the same level of compassion, but they don’t. The attempt to pull on heart strings to prove your humanity will never work. Oppression is intentional, they already know what they are doing and its effects… That’s its whole purpose.

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  4. YusefWateef

    Remember, it’s not just a Black issue. Consider this scenario:

    My gay friend Knuckle-Diamonds is a successful jeweler that has a solid record as an amateur boxer. He fights for fun, he enjoys it because his father put him into a boxing academy when he was nine. Because even though Knuckle-Diamonds didn’t know, his father knew his son was gay.

    Unfortunately for him, he would have to learn how to deliver beatings, or end up taking them.

    He can’t get past his religious leader specifically telling him that he cannot worship there, the same place his family and friends have worshiped for as long as anybody can remember. He was clearly made to understand that unless he was not Gay, or somehow stopped being Gay he could not worship there.

    Clearly, that can’t happen.

    I tried to talk to him about finding a new place, or realizing how terrible the organization he belong(ed?) to is, but he is beside himself with grief and anger.

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  5. Domina Antoinette

    Per request to post this here…

    “Often times the oppressed are those of a minority, especially of power. It is felt if those who are oppressed can gain support from those with power that they will shift the balance of power. The reality though is that people with power are reluctant to give up that power, even if they do not actually perceive it.

    One needs to recognize why there is an imbalance of power. For an example, having darker skin. For over 6 millennia, at least as long as recorded history, it was seen that having fair skin gave an automatic assertion of power while those of darker skin were stripped of any power. We see this continuation in it’s extreme in a few eastern countries where darker skin color automatically denotes a person to the lower, if not the lowest, caste. Thus it becomes a “socially acceptable” practice to marginalize groups of people, especially those who have fewer numbers, or are seen as being “lesser than”.

    Add to the social acceptance of, social constructs are put in place to enforce the stereotypes of those who are marginalized. Having less than fair skin often denotes savagery, uncouth behavior, noneducational (or at least under-educational), and impoverished. Social constructs, as seen in the US relating to race such as unfair education, mandatory minimum sentencing and so forth, are maintained to ensure those who are marginalized are kept there and thus maintain the power and social acceptance.

    For those who are oppressed they are asking those of power to denounce that which is, and has been, socially acceptable and relinquish the power they have over the oppressed. Although on an individual basis there are some within a minority who may gain some power within the established societal norms, not everyone is as fortunate. Those who seek empathy, beyond the ignorance and fear, from the majority for equality do so for those who are unable to do so due to the social constructs aforementioned.”

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    • YusefWateef

      When you say The reality though is that people with power are reluctant to give up that power, even if they do not actually perceive it. I agree. What’s happening all over the USA and in most internet-connected places all over the world is that people are being forced to see where the power lies, and it’s causing a massive upheaval. “I didn’t know.” is no longer a plausible defense.

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  6. Randall Campbell

    They expect empathy, or some form of guilt from their oppressor. However, if their oppressor had any of these feelings towards them, they wouldn’t be in such a situation. You could also look at factors such as the “Stockholm” syndrome, as well as religion. I won’t delve into the first but the later needs objective and thorough analysis. Most major monotheistic religions teach a “turn the other cheek”, “love your enemy” doctrine. A doctrine, along with others, that only serve the oppressors.

    A brief snapshot of my thoughts on the subject.

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  7. RT

    Thought it was an interesting question you posed regarding the dynamic between the oppressor and the oppressed in one of your recent posts. Initially what came to my mind were some geopolitical examples as the Palestinian conflict, but I see it extending more into human nature in general. I could see it as in modern civilizations tend to operate more on a “group think” platform, often not going “against the grain” because it is not what is more accepted or the social norm. As a result in many situations, with oppressive regimes, surveillance, people are only left with the option of turning to the oppressor. Over time I think the perception of the oppressor by the oppressed shifts to something more benevolent (especially due to propaganda usually led on by the oppressor). This ties into a lot of human dependency psychology too, an abused woman returning to her abuser.

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    • YusefWateef

      I think part of what you may be hinting at is a combination of Stockholm Syndrome / Capture Bonding, where a captive begins to empathize with a captor, and what we see from women who seek out perpetually abusive men. Relative to that, Theodore Dalrymple penned an article called Tough Love that is an excellent read.

      I always enjoy reading your perspectives RT! When are you going to do a long form guest writing for me?

      Side note: Check out my views on Palestine in Besieged.

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  8. Pingback: Poverty Is Not A State Of Mind. | Yusef Wateef, Adventurer!

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